Books on the Big Screen

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Image courtesy of Salvatore Vuono/ FreeDigitalPhotos.net

We all have our own opinions about whether movies are better than the books that they are based on.  This can depend on the presentation of characters, the content of the movie, and how the plot of the movie matches the overall plot of the book.  Movies arguably limit our perception of the characters because they give audiences a concrete idea instead of letting us use our imaginations.  Let’s use the example of Twilight like we did in the Modern Romance Novels section.  By selecting Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart to play Edward and Bella, our view of the book’s characters becomes limited to those two actors; we will be unable to picture any other actors in those roles because they have already been set.

On the other hand, defining the characters of a book in a movie allows us to formulate a picture of what the author wanted the characters to look like.  Normally with a book, we can picture the characters, but every reader has a different picture.  The descriptions can be ambiguous, which allows for open interpretation by readers.  Movies “fill in the holes” left out by authors to provide a clearer picture of the characters and their personalities.  There are two sides to this debate, and it is up to individual readers and moviegoers to decide whether they prefer movies over books or vice versa.

Both movies and books are major sources of entertainment in our society today.  We are able to imagine or view separate worlds where two people find true love and live happily ever after, even if there are complications along the way.  As romance authors continue to publish books, there will be more ideas for potential screenplays to be made into movies.  For example, Fifty Shades of Grey, a popular romance novel, is now being made into a movie.  As long as these types of novels continue to be made into movies, the romance novel will live on because of the popularity of both books and movies.

Works Cited:

Twilight. Dir. Catherine Hardwicke. By Melissa Rosenberg and Stephenie Meyer. Perf. Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart. Summit Entertainment, 2008. DVD.